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Stamp Duty Calculator UK

Stamp Duty Land Tax (SDLT, commonly known as just stamp duty) is a tax you pay when you buy property in the UK. It can get hellishly complicated – use this calculator to make it simple.

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This is just an estimate!

Tax rules change all the time and everyone's circumstances are different, so don't take anything on this page as advice! When it's time to buy, speak your solicitor for advice on stamp duty.

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Read about stamp duty for first time buyers

You could get tax relief and save thousands if you’re buying for the first time.

See what other fees you pay on a mortgage

Make sure you plan for all the costs – not just stamp duty.

How is stamp duty calculated in 2019?

How much stamp duty you pay depends on a few things:

  1. Where in the UK you’re buying: England & Northern Ireland, Scotland, or Wales
  2. Whether you’re a first time buyer
  3. If you’re buying an additional property (for example, to let out or use as a holiday home)

England & Northern Ireland SDLT (stamp duty) rates

Stamp Duty Land Tax (most people just call it ‘stamp duty’) is calculated in ‘bands’, which means you pay different rates on different ‘portions’ of the property price.

Property priceStamp Duty Rate
£0–£125,0000%
£125,001 – £250,0002%
£250,001 – £925,0005%
£925,001 – £1,500,00010%
£1,500,000+12%

Here’s an example for a property worth £300,000:

  1. You'll pay 0% on the first £125,000 = £0
  2. Then 2% on the next £125,000 = £2,500
  3. Finally, 5% on the last £50,000 = £2,500

Total stamp duty = £5,000

Scotland stamp duty rates (LBTT rate)

The equivalent of stamp duty in Scotland is the Land and Buildings Transaction Tax, or LBTT. It’s calculated in ‘bands’, which means you pay different rates on different ‘portions’ of the property price.

Property priceStamp Duty Rate
£0–£145,0000%
£145,001 – £250,0002%
£250,001 – £325,0005%
£325,001 – £750,00010%
£750,001+12%

Here’s an example for a property worth £300,000:

  1. You'll pay 0% on the first £145,000 = £0
  2. Then 2% on the next £105,000 = £2,100
  3. Finally, 5% on the last £50,000 = £2,500

Total LBTT = £4,600

Wales stamp duty rates (LTT Rate)

The equivalent of stamp duty in Wales is the Land Transaction Tax, or LTT. It’s calculated in ‘bands’, which means you pay different rates on different ‘portions’ of the property price.

Property PriceStamp Duty Rate
£0–£180,0000%
£180,001–£250,0003.5%
£250,001–£400,0005%
£400,001 – £750,0007.5%
£750,001 – £1,500,00010%
£1,500,000+12%

Here’s an example for a property worth £300,000:

  1. You'll pay 0% on the first £180,000 = £0
  2. Then 3.5% on the next £70,000 = £2,450
  3. Finally, 5% on the last £50,000 = £2,500

Total LBTT = £4,950

First time buyer stamp duty rates

In England and Northern Ireland, first time buyers get a discount on Stamp Duty Land Tax. You pay no stamp duty on a home worth £300,000 or less, then 5% on the rest up to £500,000. If you’re buying a home for more than £500,000, there’s no relief. More about first time buyer stamp duty relief.

In Scotland, first time buyers get a discount on LBTT: You pay no tax on the first £175,000 of the property price, rather than the standard £145,000. And if your property is more expensive, you still benefit from the tax relief. More about LBTT for first time buyers.

In Wales, first time buyers don’t get any LTT relief, unlike in England and Scotland where you get some relief on stamp duty and LBTT.

Buy to let (or additional property) stamp duty rates

If you’re buying an additional property (for example, a place to let), you might need to pay more stamp duty. Stamp duty for additional properties is calculated in ‘bands’, which means you pay different rates on different ‘portions’ of the property price.

Here are the stamp duty rates for England and Northern Ireland (you can find the rates for Wales here and Scotland here):

Property valueRate when buying an additional propertyStandard rate (so you can compare)
Less than £40,0000%0%
£0 – £125,0003%0%
£125,001–£250,0005%2%
£250,001–£925,0008%5%
£925,001– £1.5 million13%10%
£1.5 million+15%12%

Here’s an example, for a buy-to-let property worth £300,000:

  1. You'll pay 3% on the first £125,000 = £3,750
  2. Then 5% on the next £125,000 = £6,250
  3. Finally, you’ll pay 8% on the last £50,000 = £4,000

Total stamp duty = £14,000

Can I add stamp duty to my mortgage?

If you’ve forgotten to factor the costs of stamp duty, you could use some of your deposit to pay, if you can afford to.

You might be able to borrow more on your mortgage to cover the costs of stamp duty, but you’ll have to reduce your deposit so that the deposit and mortgage add up to the purchase price. Let’s say you’re buying a home worth £500,000, as a first time buyer in England. This means you’d need to pay £10,000 in stamp duty. If you have a £60,000 deposit, you’d have to reduce it by £10,000 to request £10,000 more on your mortgage. That now makes your deposit £50,000, and your mortgage £10,000 larger.

Usually, it’s not a good idea to increase your mortgage this way, and better to pay stamp duty from the savings you have, if possible. That’s because adding stamp duty to your mortgage means you’d need to borrow more money on your mortgage. And that has two effects:

  1. It could raise your mortgage interest rate. That’s to do with your loan to value (LTV). LTV is a percentage showing how much of the property value you’re borrowing. The lower your LTV (meaning, the lower your mortgage is as a percent of the total property value), the lower interest rates you get. Adding your stamp duty to your mortgage would increase your loan to value ratio, so you might have to pay more interest on your mortgage – which could increase your monthly mortgage payments.

  2. It could mean you end up paying far more stamp duty in the long term. Your mortgage term (the years you’ll take to pay back your mortgage) is usually around 25 years. If you add stamp duty to your mortgage, it means you’ll have to pay back interest on that amount over all those years – and that could add up to thousands. Get advice from your mortgage broker before you make a decision – they can help you figure out all the numbers and see which option is right for you.

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Stamp duty FAQ

What could be more exciting than mortgages? That’s right… mortgage tax. Here’s a handy FAQ to help you make sense of stamp duty.

Who pays stamp duty?

When do you pay stamp duty?

Do you still get stamp duty relief if you’re buying with someone else?

Shared ownership and stamp duty relief

What was the major change to UK stamp duty?

Tools & advice for your mortgage journey: